Meet the Locals

Rifleman / Tītitipounamu & New Zealand Wood Pigeon / Kererū

Submitted by Kids Restore on Sun, 12/04/2016 - 22:25

The last two of our ten most commonly seen and heard forest birds are the rifleman and the wood pigeon (http://www.doc.govt.nz/global/training-courses/bird-id/birds.swf).

The rifleman is our smallest bird. The Maōri name has both the noise of its call, 'Tītiti', and the colour green of its feathers, 'pounamu' (from 'In the Bush', N. Barraud and G. Candler, 2015).

Blackbird / Manu Pango & Tūī

Submitted by Kids Restore on Tue, 11/29/2016 - 22:00

This week's birds are the blackbird and the tūī (http://www.doc.govt.nz/global/training-courses/bird-id/birds.swf).

Only the male blackbird is actually black. It also has a distinctive orange beak. The female blackbird is brown with a variegated underside. Blackbirds mainly forage in the garden, looking for insects, earthworms, snails, and spiders. They also eat a range of seeds and fruit.

Grey Warbler / Riroriro & Tomtit / Miromiro

Submitted by Kids Restore on Sun, 11/13/2016 - 21:23

This week's birds are the grey warbler and the tomtit.

You can find them here: http://www.doc.govt.nz/global/training-courses/bird-id/birds.swf

Grey warblers are insect eaters (insectivores). Their grey feathers and tiny size mean they are often heard rather than seen. Their song is a long beautiful trill (from 'In the Bush', N. Barraud and G. Candler, 2015).

Bellbird / Korimako & Silvereye / Tauhou

Submitted by Kids Restore on Tue, 11/08/2016 - 14:26

Over the next weeks we are revisiting the ten most commonly seen and heard forest birds: bellbird, silvereye, grey warbler, tomtit, chaffinch, fantail, blackbird, tui, rifleman and New Zealand wood pigeon.

You can find them all here: http://www.doc.govt.nz/global/training-courses/bird-id/birds.swf

This week's birds are the bellbird and the silvereye.

Potato orchid / Hūperei

Submitted by Kids Restore on Fri, 09/09/2016 - 11:07

Because the soil under beech forests is low in nutrients, beech trees cooperate (work together) with fungi for survival. Not all fungi are decomposers (feed on dead organisms). Many fungi wrap their hyphae (feeding threads) around the root tips of trees and feed from the tree and in return provide some nutrients and minerals to the tree as well.

Fungi / Harore

Submitted by Kids Restore on Mon, 09/05/2016 - 20:16

There are at least 99 thousand known species of fungi in the world, and scientists think that there are at least a total of 1.5 million… which means 1 million and 401 thousand species of fungi have yet to be found!

Deer - Te tia

Submitted by Kids Restore on Mon, 08/22/2016 - 18:03

New Zealand evolved without native grazing mammals. Land mammals (apart from the native bats!) have been introduced by humans.

Deer were imported and released here from 1851 and have changed our forests and plant communities from the alpine regions to the low lands dramatically ever since. Their favourite foods include: three-finger, five-finger, lancewood, hen and chicken fern, broadleaf, māhoe, patē and high-altitude and subalpine shrubs like stinkwood.

However, deer are also keenly hunted for recreation and commercially harvested for venison.

Australasian crested grebe / Kāmana

Submitted by Kids Restore on Mon, 08/01/2016 - 18:10

This week's local is an odd one out because you cannot find it in the beach forest...

You might have noticed a floating platform bobbing on the lake in front of the Bird Sanctuary! It is a floating nest for our resident grebes and we are in the process of putting together six extra nesting rafts for them. Watch this space, if you would like to come along to our working bee - date to be confirmed, it will be advertised soon!